Bombshells and Dollies


Thank heaven for pin-up girls.

(2019) Documentary (Tri-Coast Worldwide)  Raquel Perez, Pinup Little Bit, Tom Ingram, Dita von Teese, Ivy Fox, Cherry Dollface, Brittany Jean, Miss Victory Violet, Lulu Devine, The Blue-Haired Betty, Marilia Skraba, Lisa Love, Angie Honeyburst, Ruby Red, Dixie Delight, Ginger Watson, Angelique Noire, Bo Huff, Hell Cath, Bernie Dexter, Shannon Brooke.  Directed by Daniel Halperin

 

When you think of pin-ups, you likely think of Betty Grable or Rita Hayworth; of pictures painted on the nose of bombers during World War II. You might even think of the artwork of Antonio Vargas.

]The art of the pin-up is not just for the Greatest Generation anymore. Once used as inspiration, to remind soldiers, sailors and airmen what they were fighting for back home, the art-form has undertaken a resurrection. Today, it is an expression of individuality as well as a celebration of feminine curves. They aren’t centerfolds however while undeniably sexy, it is a modest sexiness that shows enough cleavage and leg to be alluring but never tawdry. Generally in vintage fashions wearing the kind of heavy make-up that was popular in the 40s and 50s, modern pin-ups recreate the simple charm of those wholesome but undeniably sexy women. One of the best-known modern pin-up models, Dita von Teese, makes an appearance explaining how she got into the artform.

It is therefore not surprising that rockabilly culture has embraced the pin-up. Rockabilly, for those unaware of the musical form, was first popularized by Sun Records back in the 50s and counted Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent and Carl Perkins among its earliest stars. The form underwent a revival in the 80s with bands like the Stray Cats, the Blasters and the Kingpins leading the way. Today, it remains a cultural phenomenon with a thriving underground scene throughout the world.

Viva Las Vegas is the largest rockabilly festival in the world, with tens of thousands descending on the Orleans Hotel off the Vegas strip to celebrate the cars, the tattoos, the fashion and the music. A pin-up contest seemed like a natural addition and was suggested by renowned pin-up model Rockwell de Vil (real name: Raquel Perez) to festival founder Tom Ingram. It has become one of the most popular aspects of the festival since.

A panel of judges selects four finalists; a fifth is selected by the entrants. The remaining seven finalists are selected by Internet vote. The finalists are brought to the festival from all over North America and the world; in 2018, finalists represented the United States, Canada, Brazil, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Entrants also came from Italy, Russia, Denmark, the United Kingdom, France, Japan and many other countries.

The women who enter are nothing like you probably expect them to be. They come from all walks of life. Several are married with children; others are gay. The entrants have a variety of ethnic backgrounds and body types; many have been the victims of body shaming while others have gotten grief for their perceived anti-feminism. The truth be told, these ladies are the ultimate expressions of feminism; they choose to celebrate their beauty as well as their intellectual abilities and their competency in other fields. These ladies have causes, from the plight of veterans to support for suicide hotlines (one contestant lost two brothers to suicide), animal rights and other community causes. Many of the models donate their time and effort to charity.

The film is partially a celebration of pin-up culture, although it is given only a kind of cursory background which mainly concentrates on its beginning during the Second World War and doesn’t really trace its evolution. What the film is primarily, however, is a competition documentary and in that sense it is fairly typical for the genre; we get to know the contestants and then wait with anticipation as the winners for the 2018 contest are announced. Undoubtedly you will have your favorites – I know I did although I won’t tell you who all of them are. I will tell you that I was particularly fond of African-American model Pinup Little Bit, who is a wife and mom and who looks to mainstream model (and sometimes pinup) Angelina Noire as a role model. I think once you see this film you’ll agree that Pinup Little Bit is a role model herself.

One of the things I liked best about the documentary was the way that the contestants bonded. While there is a certain amount of competitiveness among them, they all realize that they are part of a subculture that is often misunderstood and many of them talk about inventing a persona of a pin-up model which they adopt once the make-up goes on. It’s actually kind of a nice thing to see. There’s also a nice little coda at the end of the film that I really appreciated, and I suspect you will too.

In fact, all of the women here are. They all have their own reasons for squeezing into the vintage dresses, putting on the lipstick and getting that Victory Wave in their hair but all of them are unforgettable. I would have preferred to see a little more context for the whole pin-up culture – it’s not just for rockabilly, kids – but the documentary is reasonably fascinating and the fact that we’re talking about some truly beautiful women doesn’t hurt either.

REASONS TO SEE: Treats the women with respect.
REASONS TO AVOID: A fairly typical contest doc.
FAMILY VALUES: There are some adult themes.
TRIVIAL PURSUIT: Pendleton and Ailes attended grade school together.
BEYOND THE THEATER: Amazon, FlixFling, Vudu
CRITICAL MASS: As of 5/15/20: Rotten Tomatoes: No score yet: Metacritic: No score yet.
COMPARISON SHOPPING: Getting Naked: A Burlesque Story
FINAL RATING: 6.5/10
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Blood and Money