Gimme Danger


Iggy Pop seems a little surprised to discover that it's 2016.

Iggy Pop seems a little surprised to discover that it’s 2016.

(2016) Musical Documentary (Magnolia/Amazon) Iggy Pop, Ron Asheton, James Williamson, Scott Asheton, Danny Fields, Steve Mackay, Mike Watt, Kathy Asheton, Ewan McGregor, Ed Sanders. Directed by Jim Jarmusch

 

The aphorism is that true artists are not appreciated in their own time. That is certainly true of the Stooges, a seminal Midwestern hard rock band that erupted from Ann Arbor, Michigan in the late 60s only to self-destruct in 1971, only to return a year later like a bad penny, then break up again for nearly 30 years in 1973 until a resurrection in 2003.

Their music received scathing reviews from critics who didn’t know what to make of them and the public took little interest; their record sales were tepid at best. Still, they became one of the founding influences of punk rock and their music influences nearly every heavy music artist of the 80s and afterwards.

Indie auteur Jim Jarmusch is a clear fan of the band, having cast frontman Iggy Pop in two of his movies and it is equally clear that this is essentially a love letter to the band. Although incomprehensibly Jarmusch begins his film with the 1973 break-up, he then goes back to their roots and tells the story in a more linear fashion from there.

Mostly told through the music documentary tropes of talking heads interviews interspersed with performance footage and animated recreations of events, the movie captures the band’s management woes along with their descent into drug addiction – nearly the entire band was at one time on heroin which led to missed gigs, sloppy performances and poor decisions. In their glory, the band was raw and primal, a kind of primitive rock and roll which would have been equally at home with banging on rocks as it was with electric guitars.

Pop was the consummate front man, performing shirtless and dancing like an epileptic male exotic dancer whose DNA was equal parts Mick Jagger and Tina Turner. His bandmates – guitarists Ron Asheton and James Williamson, bassist Dave Alexander, saxophonist Steve Mackay and drummer Scott Asheton – tended to stare at the floor and move very little allowing their frenetic frontman to do the heavy lifting.

Pop and Williamson are the only surviving band members of the band’s glory years and each of them is compelling in their own way (Mackay and the Asheton brothers both lived into the 21st century and there are plenty of interview clips with them; Alexander passed away in 1975 and as a result we see him only In performance clips and publicity stills). Pop is surprisingly intellectual and a pretty entertaining raconteur; Williamson, who spent most of their post-breakup era as a software engineer for Sony, has a much more objective perspective of the band.

The solo career of Iggy Pop, which netted classic rockers like “Lust for Life,” isn’t mentioned here although the post-Stooge efforts of the other band members is gone into in some detail. There is also little outside perspective of the band itself; nearly all of the interviews are with the band members, Danny Fields and Kathy Asheton, sister to the Asheton brothers. Only bassist Mike Watt, who performed with a 21st iteration of the band, is interviewed.

There is also surprisingly little of their music used on the soundtrack. We do get to hear those magnificent opening chords to “I Wanna Be Your Dog” but we hear it several times during the film. I get that there is precious little performance footage from the band’s 1970s era but one gets a sense that what we’re seeing here is pretty much readily available elsewhere, or at least that’s what I get from Internet comments on the documentary by fans of the group.

I was a bit surprised at how ordinary the documentary was. Jarmusch has a reputation for turning convention on its ear, but this is as conventional a music documentary as you’re likely to find. Maybe Jarmusch is too close to the subject; they are surely worthy of a documentary but this is one of those occasions where the subject of a documentary isn’t done justice by the documentary itself. Still, the Stooges are so compelling a story, Pop so entertaining a storyteller that I can freely recommend this to not only fans of the group but students of rock music history in general.

REASONS TO GO: The Stooges make for compelling subjects and Iggy is an interesting storyteller.
REASONS TO STAY: The film is disturbingly light on actual music.
FAMILY VALUES:  Plenty of profanity and drug references here.
TRIVIAL PURSUIT:  Danny Fields had been sent by Elektra Records to scout the MC5 for which the Stooges were opening; impressed by both Michigan groups, he signed the MC5 for $20K and the Stooges for $5K.
CRITICAL MASS: As of 11/20/16: Rotten Tomatoes: 94% positive reviews. Metacritic: 72/100.
COMPARISON SHOPPING: We are Twisted Fucking Sister
FINAL RATING: 6/10
NEXT: Doctor Strange

New Releases for the Week of November 18, 2016


Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find ThemFANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM

(Warner Brothers) Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Colin Farrell, Ezra Miller, Ron Perlman, Jon Voight, Dan Fogler, Johnny Depp, Zoë Kravitz.  Directed by David Yates

Young magizoologist Newt Scamander is returning home to Hogwart’s after a global tour collecting and cataloging all manner of magical creatures but is stopping in New York City briefly before the final leg home. However, things go dreadfully wrong when a No-Maj (that’s the American term for Muggle) starts a chain reaction of events that leads to the escape of some of the creatures locked in Newt’s magic case which could lead to dire consequences for both the Wizarding and No-Maj worlds. This prequel to the Harry Potter series, penned by J.K. Rowling herself, is set in 1926.

See the trailer, clips, interviews, a featurette and B-roll video here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard, 3D, IMAX 3D
Genre: Fantasy
Now Playing: Wide Release

Rating: PG-13 (for some fantasy action violence)

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

(TriStar) Joe Alwyn, Kristen Stewart, Vin Diesel, Garrett Hedlund. A 19-year-old soldier becomes a hero after a harrowing battle in Iraq. Returned home for a victory tour, his story is told in flashbacks culminating in a spectacular halftime show at a Thanksgiving Day football game in which he and his fellow soldiers of the Bravo Company are meant to be an integral part. The movie has received some acclaim for the innovative filming techniques used by Oscar-winning director Ang Lee in immersing the viewer in the battle sequences like no other film before it.

See the trailer, clips and a featurette here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: War Drama
Now Playing: Wide Release

Rating: R (for language throughout, some war violence, sexual content and brief drug use)

Bleed for This

(Open Road) Miles Teller, Aaron Eckhart, Katey Sagal, Ciarán Hinds. The pride of Providence, RI, boxer Vinnie “The Pazmanian Devil” Pazienza is on top of the world. He has just won the world championship and everything is going according to plan. Then, he is involved in a near-fatal car accident and ends up with a broken neck. Surgery that will guarantee that he’ll be able to walk again will end his boxing career so Vinnie elects to go without the surgery, although he could end up in a wheelchair. Told by everyone around him that he can’t do it, Pazienza is determined to go back into the ring – less than a year after the accident took him out of it. This is based on the inspiring true story of a boxer who didn’t have any quit in him.

See the trailer, clips, interviews, a featurette and B-roll video here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: True Sports Drama
Now Playing: Wide Release

Rating: R (for language, sexuality/nudity and some accident images)

The Edge of Seventeen

(STX) Hailee Steinfeld, Woody Harrelson, Kyra Sedgwick, Blake Jenner. There’s nothing more awkward than high school, particularly when you aren’t one of the chosen few. However, when you’re golden boy older brother starts dating your best friend, awkward doesn’t even begin to describe it.

See the trailer, clips, interviews and B-roll video here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: Dramedy
Now Playing: Wide Release

Rating: R (for sexual content, language and some drinking – all involving teens)

Gimme Danger

(Magnolia/Amazon) Iggy Pop, Ron Asheton, James Williamson, Scott Asheton. The story of Iggy Pop and the Stooges who came out of Ann Arbor, Michigan in the 1960s and essentially created punk rock a decade before its time, and kicked a hole in rock music during an era when anything and everything went from a musical standpoint. Acclaimed filmmaker Jim Jarmusch takes us through the career of the Stooges and their front man, Iggy Pop, who continues to make relevant music today.

See the trailer and a clip here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: Musical Documentary
Now Playing: Enzian Theater (Friday, Saturday and Sunday only)

Rating: R (for drug content and language)

Loving

(Focus) Joel Edgerton, Ruth Negga, Michael Shannon, Marton Csokas. The important story of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple in Virginia at a time when living as man and wife was restricted to one’s own race. The two spent nine years fighting the draconian laws that would keep them separated and took their fight all the way to the Supreme Court. The landmark decision made interracial marriage the law of the land.

See the trailer, clips, interviews, a featurette and B-roll video here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: True Life Drama
Now Playing: Regal Winter Park Village

Rating: PG-13 (for thematic elements)

The Take

(High Top/Focus) Idris Elba, Richard Madden, Charlotte Le Bon, Kelly Reilly. A pickpocket inadvertently foils the plans of a powerful but corrupt group in the French government to steal millions from French banks. He is set up to look like a terrorist and finds himself on the run. A rogue CIA agent realizes what’s happening and the two must join forces in order to take down the conspirators before they’re taken down themselves.

See the trailer and clips here.
For more on the movie this is the website.

Release Formats: Standard
Genre: Action
Now Playing: AMC Loew’s Universal Cineplex, AMC Disney Springs

Rating: R (for violence, language and some nudity)

Pick of the Litter – October 2016


BLOCKBUSTER OF THE MONTH

Inferno

Inferno

(Columbia) Tom Hanks, Felicity Jones, Ben Foster, Omar Sy. Professor Robert Langdon, hero of author Dan Brown’s best-selling novels, returns to the big screen in this third film in the Langdon series that started with The DaVinci Code, continued with Angels and Demons and now comes this one. Langdon wakes up in the hospital with amnesia and with the aid of a neurologist, tries to recover his memories. He begins to discover that in researching the writer Dante Alighieri he had stumbled on a horrifying plot with global consequences that may well see half the human race wiped out in an extinction-level pandemic. October 28

INDEPENDENT PICKS

The Great Gilly Hopkins

The Great Gilly Hopkins

(Lionsgate Premiere) Sophie Nélisse, Kathy Bates, Glenn Close, Julia Styles. Every so often I see a trailer that just grabs me. I know it shouldn’t; I know I’m probably the only critic on Earth who is as fascinated by the prospects of this movie as I am, but nonetheless here it is among the most anticipated movies for the month of October. In it, an angry young foster care girl is on her “last chance” assignment in the home of a somewhat eccentric older woman who helps her get past her rage and have a chance to find happiness, until one of her actual blood relatives shows up. I know, I know, it sounds manipulative and maudlin and yet the terrific cast and just something about the trailer just caught my attention. I may be wrong, but this might end up being a bit of a sleeper. October 7

Newtown

Newtown

(Abramorama) Sally Cox, Mark Barden, Dr. William Begg. As the process of tearing Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut down, the residents of the small town reflect on the horrible events of the day that thrust them into the world spotlight. As survivors of the attack, first responders and parents of the children murdered talk about how they’ve coped over the years, the town rallies together to get gun legislation passed. October 7

Certain Women

Certain Women

(IFC) Kristen Stewart, Michelle Williams, Laura Dern, James Le Gros. Four women in a small Northwestern town blaze trails of independence and fortitude in a town where women are expected to maintain traditional values. Director Kelly Reichardt, one of the most compelling voices in independent cinema today, weaves the tales together from Maile Meloy’s short stories into a tapestry that is not only rich and rewarding, but gives us a State of the Union address for American women in 2016 in a gentle but compelling way. October 14

Christine

Christine

(The Orchard) Rebecca Hall, Michael C. Hall, Tracy Letts, Timothy Simons. One of two movies about Christine Chubbuck, the Sarasota news anchor who in a shocking moment committed suicide live on the air during a newscast on July 14, 1974. The performance by Rebecca Hall is said to be perhaps her best ever. The movie shows the evolution of local television news and how this one event changed how we view the local news forever. This is one of two films about the incident that played at Sundance earlier this year. October 14

The Handmaiden

The Handmaiden

(Magnolia) Min-hee Kim, Tae Ri Kim, Jung-woo Ha, Jin-woong Jo. In colonial Korea of the 1930s, a young Japanese woman lives on a secluded estate and a young Korean girl is assigned to be her handmaiden. Unknown to the lady of the estate, her new servant is actually part of a plot to defraud her of her sizable inheritance. However, the situation soon becomes highly sexually charged as the conman – known only as the Count – becomes entangled with both women. This is the latest from visionary director Park Chan-wook who has given us some of the best movies of the past decade. October 21

Gimme Danger

Gimme Danger

(Magnolia/Amazon) Iggy Pop, James Williamson, Jim Jarmusch, Ron Asheton. When it comes to rock and roll, some bands define rock and roll. Iggy Pop, however, is rock and roll. Irreverent, uncompromising and in your face, the music of Iggy and the Stooges was like a supersonic jet in an era of biplanes and he presaged the glam movement, the punk movement and the indie rock movement. That’s a lot of movements. Jarmusch, one of the most respected directors on earth, is both behind and in front of the cameras for this one. October 28