New Releases for the Week of August 21, 2020


With the Regal and AMC chains opening their doors in most cities starting this weekend (including here in Orlando), there is reason for movie buffs to celebrate. Not all cinemaphiles feel comfortable going to theaters yet, but with the Florida Film Festival closing out their Enzian Theater run this Friday, it looks a little bit more like normal, although of course things are far from that. While most of the offerings in theaters will be classic movies, or films like Bloodshot and Trolls World Tour that never got a theatrical run or never got their full theatrical run. There are a handful of independent films making their debut as well, including the anticipated Train to Busan sequel Peninsula as well as Cut Throat City (pictured above), Words on a Bathroom Wall and Tulsa, among others.

The major studios will get back into the mix next week with the much-delayed Disney/fFox Marvel entry The New Mutants and then in ernest on Labor Day weekend, when the much-anticipated Tenet will finally get its American premiere (it will be playing in other countries around the world, including China starting next week) but it will be the first week of September that we here at Cinema365 headquarters anticipate that the weekly preview feature will resume. It will be an abbreviated version at first – covering only films opening locally here in Orlando, at least for September, and maybe longer until things get a little bit more normalized. The monthly preview feature Pick of the Litter will likely not return until October or even later depending on whether theaters are able to remain open.

Currently scheduled for September openings from a major studio standpoint in addition to Tenet are Bill and Ted Face the Music (September 1), The King’s Man (September 18) and Greenland (September 25). Disney+ will be making the big-budget live-action Mulan available for a fairly hefty upcharge next week, while Lionsgate will be making their horror film Antebellum available on premium VOD as of September 18. If theaters look like they’ll continue to remain open in October, I’ll run a brief summary of major studio releases as a means of helping theatergoers plan their month. However, considering how unpredictable this virus has been, theatrical release plans remain extremely fluid, to say the least.

You can continue to check the Coming Soon pages for information as to what is coming out that month along with trailers (when available). It is an understatement to say that it has been hectic and considerable effort to try and keep up with all the scheduling changes and I’m pretty sure that I haven’t been entirely successful. Please, if you see something that you are aware that is incorrect, please bring it to my attention either in the comments section here, or by directly e-mailing me at cinema365@live.com. Thanks for your patience throughout this crisis and I hope you continue to stay healthy and safe in these troubling times.

Chasing Ice


Ice, ice baby

Ice, ice baby

(2012) Documentary (Submarine Deluxe) James Balog, Svavar Jonatansson, Louie Psihoyos, Adam LeWinter, Kitty Boone, Jeff Orlowski, Tad Pfeffer, Suzanne Balog, Dennis Dimick, Emily Balog, Simone Balog, Sylvia Earle, Jason Box, Synte Peacock. Directed by Jeff Orlowski

The world is changing. That’s a given – our lives are sometimes too short a span to really notice it but I think most of us have noticed that the climate has been changing. Storms are becoming more severe; the summer of 2012 is one of the warmest ever recorded. Wildfires are becoming hotter and more frequent.

James Balog is a nature photographer with the National Geographic Society. He is one of the best in the world at it, having won numerous awards for his work which have for the most part dealt with deforestation and endangered species. He has recently become intrigued by ice and on a photo shoot in Iceland watched a massive glacier calve before his eyes.

Aware that scientists were recording that the glaciers were melting at a faster rate than previously recorded, he decided to document the event. To that end he set up the Extreme Ice Survey which raised funds through grants and Balog’s own personal  funds to set up cameras in Montana, Alaska, Greenland and Iceland (and eventually the Himalayas).

The challenges of doing this are severe. The equipment is delicate; setting up cameras designed to shoot photos once an hour for six months at a time in conditions that are as severe as any on the planet requires some innovative engineering (which doesn’t always work). Setting those cameras up requires sometimes precarious mounts which required some climbing skill. To make matters worse, Balog had some serious knee problems which eventually required four surgeries just for him to function.

But the results are worth it. Balog takes some stunning still photos of the ice which are just breathtaking while the video footage shot of the EIS team in these various locations show the stark beauty of the ice. Most importantly the time-lapse photos of the glaciers are terrifying and convincing – if you didn’t believe the scientific warnings before you will now. Of course if you listen to the airheads on Fox News you still might not.

Even more convincing is a massive calving sequence that was caught on videotape by the EIS of a glacier losing ice the size of Lower Manhattan and ten times the height of the Empire State Building. Watching the sequence literally took my breath away and left me with a pounding heart. It’s beautiful yes, but the implications for our world and our species is disturbing.

This is a movie that needs to be seen, to be shown in high schools and shown to government officials. The commentators at Fox News need to be nailed down into chairs and forced to watch it. America is the only industrialized nation on the planet that hasn’t adopted stricter carbon emission laws and it is our job as citizens not just of this nation but of the world to demand our congress do so. It behooves us to remember that we are stewards of our planet – not for those who came before but for those who come after. James Balog and Jeff Orlowski are well aware of that – and the evidence is on the screen.

REASONS TO GO: Incredible photography. Presents the argument for reducing carbon and carbon dioxide emissions concisely.

REASONS TO STAY: Only if you’re making a fortune in the oil industry and others that benefit from emitting carbons into the atmosphere.

FAMILY VALUES:  There are a few bad words uttered here and there.

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: Balog was the first photographer ever to be commissioned by the U.S. Postal Service to create a full set of stamps.

CRITICAL MASS: As of 12/18/12: Rotten Tomatoes: 96% positive reviews. Metacritic: 75/100. I would call it a critical success.

COMPARISON SHOPPING: An Inconvenient Truth

ICE AT NIGHT LOVERS: There is a sequence near the end of the movie when Balog takes pictures of ice on a bright moonlit night (he cheats a little with some well-placed lights) that is simply stunning.

FINAL RATING: 9.5/10

NEXT: The Vicious Kind