Haywire


Haywire

Gina Carano finds that Michael Fassbender makes a nice stool.

(2012) Action (Relativity) Gina Carano, Ewan McGregor, Michael Douglas, Channing Tatum, Bill Paxton, Antonio Banderas, Michael Fassbender, Michael Angarano, Mathieu Kassovitz, Eddie J. Fernandez, Aaron Cohen, Maximo Arciniega. Directed by Steven Soderbergh

 

Trust is a hard thing to come by and shouldn’t be given lightly. However at some point you have to at least hope that those in the same boat as you are going to watch your back. Sometimes though the people in that boat might have differing agendas.

Mallory Kane (Carano) is an operative working for a private security agency, the kind that takes care of things that government agencies can’t or won’t. After a hostage rescue in Barcelona doesn’t go quite according to plan, Kane and her fellow team member Aaron (Tatum) hook up before going their separate ways.

Mallory’s boss Kenneth (McGregor) next assigns her to a quick job as eye candy to MI-6 agent Paul (Fassbender) in Dublin as they pursue a French asset named Studer (Kassovitz). In a barn on the Frenchman’s estate, Mallory finds the hostage she rescued with a bullet in his brain. That raises her suspicions. When Paul turns against her and tries to kill her in their hotel room, that makes her downright paranoid.

She now has to escape her own operatives and law enforcement as she tries to get to the bottom of things as to why she was double crossed. She’ll have to discover who was behind it – Kenneth, the government official who employed him (Douglas), the diplomat (Banderas) who isn’t all he appears to be and the only person she can trust is her father (Paxton).

Stephen Soderbergh has done action movies before (The Limey) although he is best known for the Oceans 11 series. He makes a noble effort here but it falls a bit short of the mark. The problem here lies mostly in the writing. For one thing, there is no real suspense; most of the betrayals and double crosses you see coming. They’re not just telegraphed, they’re on digital video on demand.

Also, I found the pacing kind of uneven. The movie jerks along like it has sugar in the carburetor. There’s a scene of action, then a flashback, then exposition, then more action…there isn’t the kind of flow that makes a movie like this work. There’s also a distinct but odd lack of energy, like the cast and crew didn’t eat their Wheaties or something. It’s extremely laid back.

There are some good performances here. Carano, a MMF superstar, carries the load here and she shows a great deal of potential. She has one romantic encounter with Tatum and she looks like she felt awkward doing it but otherwise she handles herself well, not to mention she’s very attractive. Some female reviewers have expressed some satisfaction at watching her kick the asses of every other guy in this movie, but badass women are no stranger to Hollywood – maybe those reviewers should watch a couple of Pam Grier movies for future reference. Carano, a trained professional, is an excellent ass-kicker it must be said.

There’s lots of action for those who are into that, from car chases to occasional gun fights. I do like that Mallory works for an independent contractor and not a shadowy government agency, that is more in line with modern sensibilities. However, the pros and the cons of this film break just about even. I’m leaning towards a very slight not recommended, but I could be pushed either way.

REASONS TO GO: Plenty of action. Carano is easy on the eyes.

REASONS TO STAY: The pacing is kind of choppy. The plot is kind of predictable. Lacks passion – felt more like a payday than a movie.

FAMILY VALUES: Lots and lots and lots of violence. Then lots more.

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: Gina Carano’s voice was digitally altered to make it deeper sounding after the studio decided her voice was too-feminine sounding for the role.

CRITICAL MASS: As of 1/24/12: Rotten Tomatoes: 82% positive reviews. Metacritic: 67/100. The reviews are good.

COMPARISON SHOPPING: The Mechanic

EUROPEAN LOCATION LOVERS: Won’t be loving this. Most of the location shots could have been filmed anywhere. You never get a sense of place in this movie.

FINAL RATING: 5/10

TOMORROW: The Girl on the Train

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New Releases for the Week of January 20, 2012


January 20, 2012

UNDERWORLD AWAKENING

(Screen Gems) Kate Beckinsale, Stephen Rea, Michael Ealy, Theo James, India Eisley, Sandrine Holt, Charles Dance, Kris Holden-Ried. Directed by Mats Mjarlind and Bjorn Stein

Selene, the warrior vampire from the first two Underworld movies, returns for the fourth and we have sorely missed her. She has an excuse however – she was captured by humans and placed in suspended animation, which sounds like Pixar in detention. Bad puns aside, she escapes and discovers that the humans have discovered the existence of the vampires and the Lycans and has entered into a war into the both of them – and is winning. However, there’s a new player in the game, one that threatens to wipe out everybody – and a little girl is the key to it all, a little girl under Selene’s protection.

See the trailer, interviews and a clip here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard, 3D, IMAX 3D

Genre: Horror Action

Rating: R (for strong violence and gore, and for some language)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

(Warner Brothers) Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Thomas Horn, Max von Sydow. An inventive, imaginative 11-year-old boy’s world is shattered when his father dies in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. He finds a key in his father’s belongs and becomes convinced that the key unlocks something of great significance to his dad. Therefore, he goes on a quest to find the lock that the key opens and along the way will find others with broken hearts in need of healing just like him. I don’t often cry during trailers but I did during this one.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Drama

Rating: PG-13 (for emotional thematic material, some disturbing images and language)

Haywire

(Relativity) Gina Carano, Ewan McGregor, Michael Douglas, Antonio Banderas.  A highly trained CIA operative is sent on what appears to be a routine mission mostly acting as arm candy for another agent. However when that other agent tries to kill her, she realizes that she’s been betrayed by someone at the agency close to her. She has to go out on her own in order to find out who’s behind it and get them before they get her. MMA star Carano makes her film debut in the latest from prolific Oscar-nominated director Steven Soderbergh.

See the trailer, clips and web-only content here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Action

Rating: R (for some violence)

 

Red Tails

(20th Century Fox) Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard, Bryan Cranston, Nate Parker. This is the story of the Tuskegee Airmen, a squadron of African American fighters during World War II who not only had to fight the Nazis but the U.S. Army as well who didn’t believe they had the ability to be fighter pilots. As it turned out, they were one of the most decorated squadrons of the war, with more enemy kills than almost anybody else.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: War Drama

Rating: PG-13 (for some sequences of war violence)