My One and Only


My One and Only

Renee Zellweger is courted by yet another unsuitable suitor.

(Freestyle Releasing) Renee Zellweger, Logan Lerman, Kevin Bacon, Chris Noth, Troy Garity, David Koechner, Eric McCormack, Steven Weber, Nick Stahl, Mark Rendall, Robin Weigert. Directed by Richard Loncraine

The road to growing up can often be a treacherous and confusing one, even under the best of circumstances. Sometimes that road can take you to some really unexpected places and unexpected conclusions.

Ann Devereaux (Zellweger) is a willful, beautiful blonde Southern belle who is the trophy wife of bandleader Danny Devereaux (Bacon). He is best known for the hit song “My One and Only” (not the Gershwin song, for those who know the standards well). He is also a philanderer, the kind of guy who simply can’t help himself when it comes to women. When Ann comes home to Danny “entertaining” a young lady – in her bed – it’s the last straw. She cleans out the safety deposit box, buys a baby blue Cadillac Coupe de Ville and hits the road, her sons George (Lerman) and Robbie (Rendall) in tow.

Robbie is a closet homosexual who dreams of Hollywood; George is a bit more grounded and yearns to write. Ann’s only aspiration is to find a rich husband to support her and her boys in the manner in which they’ve been accustomed to.

This doesn’t go very well. Each stop brings another loser, from Wallace McAllister (Weber), a businessman who is nearly broke and who rifles through Ann’s wallet and runs off while she’s in the restroom. Then there’s Col. Harlan Williams (Noth), a rabid anti-Communist military sort who has a streak of violence in him that isn’t compatible with Ann’s gentrified soul. Old flame Charlie (McCormack) makes no bones about it – Ann’s shelf life as a bombshell has expired, and she is competing with younger women for the same scraps. This leads to a misunderstanding that gets Ann arrested.

Nonetheless, she perseveres, even though George outwardly doubts her decision making and making it clear he wants to go back to his dad, who is less than enthusiastic about taking him. Ann then determines to work for a living, but after disastrous attempts at waitressing and sales, Ann finally meets a paint retail tycoon named Bill Massey (Koechner) who looks to be the most promising suitor yet, but even that doesn’t work out as planned.

The movie is loosely based on the life of actor George Hamilton, who is as well known for his tan and his tango these days as he is for his acting career (he’s also the executive producer of the movie). While it doesn’t give you insight into his acting, the movie will at least give you some insight into the man.

The movie has a bit of a split personality, in a good way. The first part of the movie really belongs to Zellweger, and she carries it pretty well. Nobody does plucky, ditzy blonde quite as well as Zellweger (see the Bridget Jones movies, although Lisa Kudrow does nearly as well on “Friends”), and she captivates the screen throughout. Her Ann Devereaux is brave and terminally cheerful, but with a hint of diva in the background. It must have been a fun role to play and you can see Zellweger enjoying herself.

The second half is Lerman’s, and while his story is a bit more complex, he doesn’t quite rise to the challenge but neither does he fail utterly. Instead, he delivers a solid but unspectacular job that doesn’t measure up to the luminescent performance of Zellweger. Each of the suitors have their own charms, although Koechner surprisingly does the most memorable work here as the troubled tycoon. Some of his scenes have a poignancy that elevates the movie quite a bit, as well as the comic timing Koechner is better known for.

Loncraine does a really nice job of evoking the 50s; the setting lives and breathes in his capable hands instead of being something of a distraction as period pieces often are. This is an era that feels lived in, from the posh penthouses of Manhattan to the grubby motels on Route 66. While this is ostensibly a comedy (and there are some funny portions to it), the truth is the dramatic portions work better; you get the feeling Loncraine was going for a bit of a screwball feel (one review likened it to the work of Preston Sturges, which is a dead on observation).

This got a very limited release when it came out and largely flew under the radar. It deserves better; there are some very fine performances and some nice moments, enough to make this a solid recommendation. Check it out on cable or at your local home video emporium; you’ll be glad you did.

WHY RENT THIS: Lerman does a credible job, while Koechner is surprisingly effective. The era is nicely evoked. Zellweger is excellent as the fading bombshell past her prime.

WHY RENT SOMETHING ELSE: Tries too hard to be a screwball comedy.

FAMILY VALUES: There’s a little bit of bad language and some sexuality here and there; nothing you should be ashamed of showing to a 13-year-old.

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: The movie is dedicated to Merv Griffith, who helped Hamilton develop the project and shepherded it through filming, but didn’t live to see it completed.

NOTABLE DVD EXTRAS: None listed.

FINAL RATING: 6.5/10

TOMORROW: Lorna’s Silence

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New Releases for the Week of September 11, 2009


 

Peek-a-boo!!

Peek-a-boo!!

9

(Focus) Starring the voices of Elijah Wood, Jennifer Connelly, Martin Landau, Christopher Plummer, John C. Reilly, Crispin Glover. Directed by Shane Acker

Humankind is extinct, wiped out by machines of their own making. If you thought that’s the next Terminator film, you’d be wrong. That’s how this feature animation begins, which is based on an animated short that was a critical hit on the festival circuit a few years back (Da Queen and I caught it at the Florida Film Festival and can testify that it is one of the finest animated shorts we’ve ever seen, completely creative and imaginative). Nine ragdoll creations, given the breath of life by a human genius, are all that remains of Homo sapiens. They must find a way to survive against the marauding machines, bent on their destruction. Discovering a way to beat the machines is the key to the survival of civilization.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for violence and scary images)

My One and Only

(Freestyle) Renee Zellweger, Logan Lerman, Kevin Bacon, Chris Noth. Ann Devereaux leaves her philandering husband in search of a new mate more worthy of her, with her teenage sons in tow. However, wealthy men who are loving and loyal are in short supply in 1953 and her feminine charms have lost a bit of luster since she was last single two decades prior. As a parade of suitors come and go, the boys go through a series of increasingly less glamorous living arrangements the three come to rely on each other more than they ever thought they could and Ann provides them with a different future than they could ever have imagined.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for sexual content and language)

Sorority Row

(Summit) Briana Evigan, Leah Pipes, Rumer Willis, Jamie Chung. When a prank goes horribly wrong, five sorority sisters agree to keep the inadvertent death of a sister hidden. Unfortunately, an unseen, homicidal monster seems to know all their hidden secrets and is picking off the sorority girls one by bloody one. Following a recent trend, this is a remake of an Eighties horror film, The House on Sorority Row.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for strong bloody violence, language, some sexuality/nudity and partying)

Thirst

(Focus) Song Kang-ho, Shin Ha-kyun, Kim Ok-bi, Kim Hae-sook. From the director of Oldboy and Lady Vengeance comes this sensual, ultra-violent vampire film. When a priest receives a transfusion with tainted blood, he is forced to exist in the half-life of a vampire. When the wife of a friend comes to him begging to help her escape from her life, he enters a carnal world of desire and sensation that is at odds with his long-held faith, creating a war within himself that can only end in tragedy.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for graphic bloody violence, disturbing images, strong sexual content, nudity and language)

Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself

(Lionsgate) Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson, Mary J. Blige, Adam Rodriguez. When Madea, the pistol-packing grandma from previous Tyler Perry films catches three young kids robbing her home, she packs them off to live with their only relative April, who wants nothing to do with them. She’s a self-centered nightclub singer who sponges off her married boyfriend and lives for her own immediate gratification, until a Mexican immigrant enters her life and shows her that true love may be possible, but only if she can give up her selfish ways. Can she choose love over material things?

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for mature thematic material involving a sexual assault on a minor, violence, drug references and smoking)

Whiteout

(Warner Brothers) Kate Beckinsale, Gabriel Macht, Tom Skerritt, Columbus Short. The lone U.S. Marshall assigned to Antarctica is confronted by the first murder on the frozen continent. She is drawn into a mystery that she must solve before winter sets in and strands her in the darkness with the killer. Based on the Oni Press graphic novel.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for violence, grisly images, brief strong language and some nudity)