Sorority Row


Sorority Row

Most sorority sisters will tell you that a sorority house is just a series of excuses to dress up in lingerie.

(2009) Slasher Horror (Summit) Briana Evigan, Leah Pipes, Rumer Willis, Jamie Chung, Audrina Partridge, Carrie Fisher, Julian Morris, Margo Harshman, Matt O’Leary. Directed by Stewart Hendler

The slasher movie is a time-honored tradition that usually involves a mysterious, hooded or masked maniac, lots of women in lingerie, bikinis, miniskirts or nothing at all and a series of grisly but imaginative murders. The 1983 opus The House on Sorority Row combined all of these elements and while not a classic of the genre, was certainly one of its better moments.

Flash forward to 2009 and an all-new rendition of it, mostly starring ladies from television shows (Audrina Partridge from “The Hills,” Leah Pipes from “Terminator: The Sarah Connors Chronicles”) or low-rent movies (Briana Evigan from Step Up 2, Jamie Chung from Dragonball: Evolution) with daughters of the famous (Rumer Willis – daughter of Bruce Willis and Demi Moore, Evigan – daughter of “BJ and the Bear’s” Greg Evigan). It would seem to be a winning mix.

The sisters of the Theta Pi sorority at Rosman College (the original party school) decide to pull a stunt on the cheating boyfriend of Megan (Partridge) by convincing him that the date rape drug they supplied him with had caused an overdose, after which they would have to dispose of the body. This takes place at a sorority house party in which ingénues in lingerie stage beer chugging contests, pillow fights in a scenario that could only take place in the fevered imagination of an adolescent male who yearns for the opportunity to see a bare breast up close and personal – or the mind of a cynical Hollywood screenwriter who is catering to him.

The prank goes horribly wrong when the panicky frat boy, wanting to make sure the “dead” Megan is truly dead, shoves a tire iron into her chest with lethal force. The shocked sisters are bullied by Jessica (Pipes), the queen bee of the crew, to toss the body down the mine shaft (which was what they had convinced the frat boy they were going to do in the first place) and Never Speak of This Again to Anybody. Yeah, right – as if. Cassidy (Evigan), the brainy one who has the closest thing to a moral center at first refuses but is peer pressured into reluctantly agreeing to it.

Months later as the group prepares for their graduation party, they begin to get text messages from the victims’ cell phone. Could it be Megan – back from the dead and seeing revenge? Or maybe her creepy sister, who has turned up unexpectedly?  In any case, sisters start turning up sliced and diced by a mysterious hooded figure wielding a tire iron. Now that’s what I call a party.

The clichés are abounding here, and director Hendler doesn’t seem much disposed to straying beyond them. Mostly, the girls have little to do but wear clothes that say less college sorority girl and more slut and scream periodically. While I admit it’s nice to see Carrie Fisher onscreen (as the feisty house mother whose best line is “Do you think you scare me? I run a house with fifty bitches in it!”), the part is so very beneath her. You’d think that Princess Leia would be able to get better parts.

Now I know what you’re thinking. Carlos – this is a slasher movie. Nobody goes to see it for the acting – their target audience just wants boobs and really clever murders, the more gruesome the better. While there are plenty of boobs, where the movie fails to deliver is on the murders. The payoffs are rarely there and even the build-ups are pretty lame. Yes, a couple of the murders are nicely done but the bulk of them are rather anticlimactic. That’s not a word you want to use when describing a slasher flick.

The fact that the movie was profitable is owed more to its low production cost rather than its quality. A word to prospective producers of slasher movies; think how much more profitable your movies would be if you threw a well-scripted, well-executed movie with exciting murder scenes on top of the breasts and lingerie? This movie demonstrates that the market is there for it. Now we just need some filmmakers to deliver on it; unfortunately, these didn’t.

WHY RENT THIS: Some nice scares and a couple of really well-done murders. It’s nice to see Fisher onscreen, even though it’s in a role that’s clearly beneath her.  

WHY RENT SOMETHING ELSE: The concept has been done to death and the movie doesn’t particularly bring anything new to the table. While there are a few good scares, mostly it’s just gruesome.

FAMILY VALUES: Lots of violence, plenty of gore, sexuality and nudity, foul language, teen drinking – pretty much the whole gamut.

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: Rosman College, the setting for the movie, is named for Mark Rosman, who wrote and directed the 1983 original and is an executive producer on this film.

NOTABLE DVD EXTRAS: None listed.

BOX OFFICE PERFORMANCE: $27.2M on a $12.5M production budget; the movie was profitable.

FINAL RATING: 4/10

TOMORROW: The Mechanic (2011)

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New Releases for the Week of September 11, 2009


 

Peek-a-boo!!

Peek-a-boo!!

9

(Focus) Starring the voices of Elijah Wood, Jennifer Connelly, Martin Landau, Christopher Plummer, John C. Reilly, Crispin Glover. Directed by Shane Acker

Humankind is extinct, wiped out by machines of their own making. If you thought that’s the next Terminator film, you’d be wrong. That’s how this feature animation begins, which is based on an animated short that was a critical hit on the festival circuit a few years back (Da Queen and I caught it at the Florida Film Festival and can testify that it is one of the finest animated shorts we’ve ever seen, completely creative and imaginative). Nine ragdoll creations, given the breath of life by a human genius, are all that remains of Homo sapiens. They must find a way to survive against the marauding machines, bent on their destruction. Discovering a way to beat the machines is the key to the survival of civilization.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for violence and scary images)

My One and Only

(Freestyle) Renee Zellweger, Logan Lerman, Kevin Bacon, Chris Noth. Ann Devereaux leaves her philandering husband in search of a new mate more worthy of her, with her teenage sons in tow. However, wealthy men who are loving and loyal are in short supply in 1953 and her feminine charms have lost a bit of luster since she was last single two decades prior. As a parade of suitors come and go, the boys go through a series of increasingly less glamorous living arrangements the three come to rely on each other more than they ever thought they could and Ann provides them with a different future than they could ever have imagined.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for sexual content and language)

Sorority Row

(Summit) Briana Evigan, Leah Pipes, Rumer Willis, Jamie Chung. When a prank goes horribly wrong, five sorority sisters agree to keep the inadvertent death of a sister hidden. Unfortunately, an unseen, homicidal monster seems to know all their hidden secrets and is picking off the sorority girls one by bloody one. Following a recent trend, this is a remake of an Eighties horror film, The House on Sorority Row.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for strong bloody violence, language, some sexuality/nudity and partying)

Thirst

(Focus) Song Kang-ho, Shin Ha-kyun, Kim Ok-bi, Kim Hae-sook. From the director of Oldboy and Lady Vengeance comes this sensual, ultra-violent vampire film. When a priest receives a transfusion with tainted blood, he is forced to exist in the half-life of a vampire. When the wife of a friend comes to him begging to help her escape from her life, he enters a carnal world of desire and sensation that is at odds with his long-held faith, creating a war within himself that can only end in tragedy.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for graphic bloody violence, disturbing images, strong sexual content, nudity and language)

Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself

(Lionsgate) Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson, Mary J. Blige, Adam Rodriguez. When Madea, the pistol-packing grandma from previous Tyler Perry films catches three young kids robbing her home, she packs them off to live with their only relative April, who wants nothing to do with them. She’s a self-centered nightclub singer who sponges off her married boyfriend and lives for her own immediate gratification, until a Mexican immigrant enters her life and shows her that true love may be possible, but only if she can give up her selfish ways. Can she choose love over material things?

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: PG-13 (for mature thematic material involving a sexual assault on a minor, violence, drug references and smoking)

Whiteout

(Warner Brothers) Kate Beckinsale, Gabriel Macht, Tom Skerritt, Columbus Short. The lone U.S. Marshall assigned to Antarctica is confronted by the first murder on the frozen continent. She is drawn into a mystery that she must solve before winter sets in and strands her in the darkness with the killer. Based on the Oni Press graphic novel.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Rating: R (for violence, grisly images, brief strong language and some nudity)