The Commune (Kollektivet)


A communal meal isn’t always a peaceful one.

(2016) Drama (Magnolia) Ulrich Thomsen, Fares Fares, Trine Dyrholm, Lars Ranthe, Julie Agnete Vang, Helene Reingaard Newmann, Ole Dupont, Lise Koefoed, Magnus Millang, Martha Sofie Wallstrøm Hansen, Mads Reuther, Anne Gay Henningsen, Jytte Kvinesdal, Morten Rose, Rasmus Lind Rubin, Adam Fischer, Ida Maria Vinterberg. Directed by Thomas Vinterberg

When we think of the 70s, what comes to mind is recreational drug use, long hair, bell bottoms, anti-war protests and free love. Although communes still exist, they are more like co-ops these days rather than all of the inhabitants sleeping with each other, although there are some like that to be sure.

Erik (Thomsen) is a somewhat stuffy professor of architecture at a University in Copenhagen. His wife Anna (Dyrholm) is a beautiful news reader working for the national broadcast network. When Erik inherits what is essentially a mansion from his father in a rural suburb of Copenhagen, he initially wants to sell it; their daughter Freja (Hansen) wants to move into it but it is Anna who comes up with the idea they eventually adopt – to invite friends and strangers to move in and create their own commune.

You see, Anna has become somewhat bored in her marriage and wants variety, but as they say, be careful what you wish for. She and Erik invite friends at first like Ole (Ranthe) who has a bit of a temper but soon they are inviting fascinating strangers and before too long there are a dozen or so adults and children living in the commune.

Things go pretty well at first but things begin to lose cohesion. One of the children who has a heart condition (and quite the crush on Freja) is taken to the hospital, scaring the whole community on Christmas Eve. But to make matters worse, Erik falls in love with Emma (Newmann), one of his students and invites her to join the Commune. At first, Anna is pretty sanguine about the whole situation but she begins to crack and soon the tension in the Commune becomes nearly unbearable.

I’m not so sure this is an indictment of free love and the sexual politics of the 70s as it is more or less simply presenting the pros and cons. In all honesty most of the couples in the commune stay fairly faithful to one another with the exception of Erik – and it must be said that Anna paved the way for that in many ways. Judging Erik by standards that are 40 years after the period depicted here isn’t really fair but by our standards he’s quite the jerk.

The performances here are top-notch; most of the actors are not well-known in the U.S. with the exception of Fares and to a lesser extent Thomsen. The prize though goes to Dyrholm who goes from a strong and confident woman to an absolute mess by the end of the film. Badly shaken not so much by Erik’s infidelity – I think she could have handled an affair so long as Erik still loved her but once it became a case where Erik loved Emma and not Anna she was absolutely destroyed.

The director manages to get the era right between the colloquialisms, the products and the overall attitude. The cinematography is a little bit on the washed out side for exterior day shots (and underlit for night shots both inside and out) which also gives the film a look of a film made in that era.

Despite the pathos and drama (and there’s a lot of the latter) there is some comedy as well that comes up at unexpected times. The Danish have a very quirky sense of humor and it shows here when its needed. What’s not needed is some of the pretentious dialogue – and I realize back in that decade people tended to talk like walking manifestos – and especially the soap opera aspects of the film which are also many. That detracts from a film which most of the rest of the way is serious and fascinating.

Still, human relationships are tricky things whether you’re talking about the 70s or the 2010s. We are complicated little monkeys and we do things sometimes that make no logical sense. It is said that being alone is perfection – you make all your decisions and do as you please when you please. Two is a compromise and three is a disaster. The more people you put at the same table, the more complex things get.

Vinterberg has some really great films to his credit including one of my all time Florida Film Festival favorites The Hunt. This is another strong movie on his filmography and he continues to be a director who hasn’t yet really gotten the credit he deserves here in the States. Then again, he hasn’t done a lot of English language films yet and I’m not sure he needs to. Still, he’s one of those directors whose name on the credits means I’m instantly interested in seeing his film. There are not many about whom I can say that.

REASONS TO GO: The sexual politics are captured nicely. The film is very evocative of its era. Thought-provoking, the movie manages to get in a little bit of comedy as well. The performances are strong all around.
REASONS TO STAY: Pretentious in places, the movie sinks into soap opera a little too much.
FAMILY VALUES: Here you’ll find nudity, sexuality and profanity.
TRIVIAL PURSUIT: The movie is based on a play Vinterberg wrote about his own experiences as a child growing up in a commune.
BEYOND THE THEATERS: Amazon, Fandango Now, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube
CRITICAL MASS: As of 8/2/17: Rotten Tomatoes: 72% positive reviews. Metacritic: 60/100.
COMPARISON SHOPPING: The Overnight
>FINAL RATING: 8/10
NEXT: Lady Macbeth

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New Releases for the Week of June 7, 2013


The Internship

THE INTERNSHIP

(20th Century Fox) Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson, Max Minghella, Rose Byrne, John Goodman, Will Ferrell, Aasif Mandvi, Josh Gad, Dylan O’Brien. Directed by Shawn Levy

Two old school salesmen are left in the lurch when the company they work for shuts its doors. Unable to find work utilizing their talents they seize what could be their last chance – an internship at Google. Competing against much younger applicants who are much more technologically savvy than they are, it will be up to them to prove their worth in this brave new world and that you can, after all, teach old dogs new tricks.

See the trailer and a clip here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Comedy

Rating: PG-13 (for sexuality, some crude humor, partying and language)

Love is All We Need

(Sony Classics) Pierce Brosnan, Trine Dyrholm, Molly Blixt Egelind, Paprika Steen. Two middle aged people whose own romantic lives have been disappointing travel to Italy to attend the wedding of their children. As it turns out, a change of scenery could be just what their hearts need. From director Susanne Bier whose last film was the Oscar-winner In a Better World.

See the trailer and a clip here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Rating: R (for brief sexuality, nudity and some language) 

The Purge

(Universal) Ethan Hawke, Lena Headey, Adelaide Kane, Max Burkholder. In the near future, the crime rate has plummeted to near zero. The reason for that is that for one night every year for twelve hours, all crime is legal – including murder. The police take the night off. Hospitals shut their doors. Citizens are on their own. One family, in a gated community with expensive security, expects to hunker in their bunker and wait out the storm but when a stranger comes a’knockin’, the movie starts a’rockin’.

See the trailer and clips here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Thriller

Rating: PG-13 (for strong disturbing violence and some language)

Stories We Tell

(Roadside Attractions) Sarah Polley, Tom Butler, Peter Evans, Michael Polley. Oscar-nominated director Sarah Polley looks at a single extended family and examines how their recollections of a critical event in the family’s history has shaped them – and how those memories differ from person to person. The family in the crosshairs of her camera lens? Her own.

See the trailer and a clip here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Documentary

Rating: PG-13 (for thematic elements involving sexuality, brief strong language and smoking) 

Violet and Daisy

(Roadside Attractions) Saoirse Ronan, Alexis Bledel, James Gandolfini, Danny Trejo. A pair of teenage assassins take a surreal trip through New York. They are tested with a series of opponents with varying skills and degrees of difficulty. They also meet a mysterious man, the encounter with whom may turn out to be life-altering..

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Action

Rating: R (for violence, disturbing behavior and language) 

Yamla Pagla Deewana 2

(Sunny Sounds) Dharmendra, Sunny Deol, Bobby Deol, Kristina Akheeva. The trio from the hit movie Yamla Pagla Deewana reunite in England. When one of them opens a nightclub in London, the other two come help him celebrate but can’t resist pulling off another con job which lands all three of them in hot water.

See the trailer here.

For more on the movie this is the website.

Release formats: Standard

Genre: Bollywood

Rating: NR