The Deer Hunter


Are you talking to me?

Are you talking to me?

(1978) Drama (Universal) Robert De Niro, John Cazale, John Savage, Christopher Walken, Meryl Streep, George Dzundza, Chuck Aspegren, Shirley Stoler, Rutanya Alda, Pierre Segui, Mady Kaplan, Amy Wright, Mary Ann Haenel, Richard Kuss, Joe Grifasi, Christopher Columbi Jr., Victoria Karnafel, Jack Scardino, Joe Strnad, Helen Tomko. Directed by Michael Cimino

Waiting for Oscar

1979 OSCAR NOMINATIONS
Best Actor – Robert De Niro
Best Supporting Actress – Meryl Streep
Best Original Screenplay – Michael Cimino, Deric Wasburn, Louis Garfinkle, Quinn K. Redeker
Best Cinematography – Vilmos Zsigmond
WINS – 5
Best Picture
Best Director – Michael Cimino
Best Supporting Actor – Christopher Walken
Best Sound
Best Editing

Ritual are an important part of life. We mark various rites of passage – birthdays, weddings, funerals – with rituals whether we label them such or not. Rituals give our lives a sense of constancy, a feeling of continuation and connect us to past, present and future.

Mike (De Niro) is a Pennsylvania steelworker on his last day before joining the army with his buddies Steve (Savage) and Nick (Walken). Steve is also getting married to Angela (Alda) who is pregnant but not by Steve. The wedding is a traditional Russian Orthodox ceremony followed by a traditional raucous Russian reception. Nick proposes to his girlfriend Linda (Streep) and the next day the three friends, joined by their friends Stosh (Cazale), John (Dzundza) and Axel (Aspegren) go hunting for deer. Mike tells the group about his “one shot” philosophy of hunting.

Next it’s off to Vietnam. The three men are sent their separate ways but against all odds are reunited unexpectedly during an attack on a village which the NVA has occupied. Unfortunately, the attack fails and all three men are captured and sent to a prisoner of war camp.

They are tortured by sadistic guards and forced to play Russian roulette against one another. Mike manages to outwit his guards and shoots them, allowing the three men to escape. By chance an army helicopter finds them but only Nick is able to board it. Steve, who is badly injured, floats down the river and Mike goes after him to rescue them. He manages to carry Steve to safety.

Nick becomes involved in underground Russian Roulette parlors in Vietnam while Mike goes home. Embarrassed by the fuss everyone makes over his return, he tries to locate Steve. Eventually Mike locates him in a local veterans hospital. Mike is eager to go back to Vietnam and find Nick whom he is certain is still alive and whom he promised he wouldn’t leave behind in that country. All three men will eventually return home in their own way but none will come back the same as when they left.

In many ways, this is as powerful a movie as you’re likely to ever see. Cimino, definitely inspired by the scope and grandeur of The Godfather, seems to want to make a movie that explores America’s mixed emotions about the Vietnam war. Cimino wants to make an adult epic, one with plenty of symbolism and foreshadowing. While I can applaud his ambitions I do believe his reach exceeded his grasp.

This is a movie that dwells on minutiae. It comes to the point – and surpasses it – of being cinematic babble. The wedding sequence that takes place over the film’s first hour (!) is a good 45 minutes too long. While it’s supposed to establish what the men are giving up and leaving behind, at the end of the day I don’t think all of this is necessary to the story. Worse yet, Cimino and his co-writers create lapses that sacrifice logic for emotional power. For example, the Russian roulette sequences which are at the heart of the film – what captor would give his captive a loaded weapon? That’s why there are no recorded instances of American POWs being forced to shoot themselves as is depicted here. Why wouldn’t you shoot your captor if you were going to do that?

That isn’t to say that there aren’t some powerful performances to be observed here. De Niro was in his heyday, on a string of roles that established him as one of America’s best actors in the 70s and 80s (and of course all the way through until now) and his work as the film’s moral center garnered him yet another Oscar nomination. Streep, already with two Oscar wins to her credit, was luminous as Linda while Walken established his career with a searing performance that would win him Oscar gold.

Ultimately what undoes the movie is its lack of focus. I’ve watched the movie several times and each time I try to find what it is that has so engrossed people whose opinion I respect and who consider this one of the best movies ever made. Each time I come away unable to find that same level of respect, although there is some. Ultimately I am let down by this film, one which in trying to be realistic, symbolic and thoughtful falls into the abyss of being none of the things it tries to be. In my opinion, this is the most overrated Best Picture winner of all time.

WHY RENT THIS: Some powerful performances by some of the best actors of the time whose careers received big boosts from this film.

WHY RENT SOMETHING ELSE: Overblown, overrated, overly long wedding sequence, full of plot holes and inconsequential business.

FAMILY VALUES:  Some extremely intense situations and images, war violence, language and sexuality.

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: Cazale was in the final stages of cancer when filming began and due to his weakened condition, his scenes were filmed first. When the studio caught wind of his condition, they put pressure on Cimino to replace the dying actor but Meryl Streep put her foot down and threatened to leave the production if Cazale was removed. He died shortly after filming was completed.

NOTABLE HOME VIDEO EXTRAS: Unbelievably, nothing but the usual suspects.

BOX OFFICE PERFORMANCE: $5M on an $8M production budget.

COMPARISON SHOPPING: Platoon

FINAL RATING: 5/10

NEXT: Waiting for Oscar concludes!

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Looking Ahead


Things are going to start to get interesting around here over the next year. In addition to the features and review festivals that we have been doing, we’re adding some new festivals starting tomorrow with our special Waiting for Oscar mini-festival – three days of movie reviews of films that have been nominated for or won Oscar gold.

February will bring our regular romance festival Cinema of the Heart with what we think are four particularly excellent romance movies, all certified excellent for cuddling. Look for that beginning on February 11. Starting on Thursday March 13, a new festival – Our Film Library – will begin. All of these are movies or documentaries based on books, novels or other literature.

April will be all about our Florida Film Festival coverage beginning on April 4th this week, although we’ll be posting a preview for it just about as soon as we get information about the event (usually the first or second week of March). After that our annual Off-Shoring festival of movies from outside the United States will commence on Saturday April 26.

June 6th will bring a brand new mini-festival called Woman Power – movies by or about women. That’s one we’re hoping to expand in years to come. July 2nd will once again bring our mini-festival the American Experience – movies that are quintessentially American or give us insight into what it is to be an American.

Another new mini-festival debuts August 14 – Films 4 Foodies, movies that are all about cooking, eating or anything that has to do with consuming edible things. September 15 brings yet another new mini-festival – the Sci-Fi Spectacular. Science fiction has always been one of my favorite genres and here we will present reviews of new and/or classic films in science fiction and fantasy.

October is as always the domain of our fan favorite 6 Days of Darkness and this year will be no exception as October 26 will bring out the spookiest of spooktaculars. This year we’re hoping to return to writing scary short stories inspired by each of the films reviewed although I can’t make any promises in that regard. Finally, the Holly and the Quill annual series of Christmas-themed movie reviews starts up on December 23.

In addition to all this, you’ll be able to read my reviews in other places. I’m pleased to report that my pal John Orr, noted author, raconteur and Trivia connoisseur has begun a new website called Regarding Arts. Some (but not all) of my reviews will be found there as well. You can also find reviews of books, music and live theater there by some pretty nifty writers whom I’m very honored to be among. You can head over there by clicking on the website here: www.regardingarts.com. You’ll thank me for it later…or curse me for giving you another site to check obsessively.

So it’s going to be a bit busy around these parts and hopefully you’ll like the new additions. If you’d like to see some different film review festivals, suggest a film for review or give us feedback about the site, leave a comment here or if you’d prefer, drop us a note at cinema365@live.com. We’re always happy to hear from you.